OSR Class: Reiver

"Harrow! Harrow! To all true-blooded men and women I call ye to trod against the cowards of Clan Dremond, who stole away with mine two nights ago! Harrow! Harrow!" - 'Black' Tom Maughan, Marcher Reiver.

I'll upload more about the War soon, I promise.

Fighters are combat experts who excel at engaging and destroying multiple targets. Wizards have a variety of magical powers at their fingertips. A Sawbones can patch you up in an instant. A Thief can sneak and steal like no other. Reivers are dirty fighters who focus on getting in and out quickly, sowing chaos as they go, while knowing the lay of the land and being able to sneak around to find the best loot.

Darkest Dungeon, Highwayman

Reiver

Starting Equipment: light armour, dagger, pistol, 12 Apostles.

A: Slewe Dogge; Plunder.
B: Arsonist; Hot Trod.
C: Opportunist.
D: Harrow.

You gain +1 Stealth and +1 to Saves vs exposure and inclement weather for each Reiver template you possess.

Slewe Dogge
You may mark a target within your line of sight. You can track them across virtually any terrain provided that they are no more than three days ahead of you. If they are more than three days ahead then you must make an INT check. If they are more than a week ahead, or poor weather affects their tracks, you must roll INT/2.

Plunder
You may ignore a point of Encumbrance inflicted by an item worth over 200sp. This applies to containers holding valuables, i.e. a chest or sack filled with coin, as well as single items, i.e. a golden idol.

Arsonist
You know fire. You take 1 Boon on attacks made with burning oil flasks, molotov cocktails, firebombs or any other fire-based attacks. Gunpowder weapons and explosives don't count, but hurling a burning branch does.

Hot Trod
Once per day you may remove 1d4 levels of Fatigue from either yourself or your mount.

Opportunist
Whenever you get a situational bonus to an attack roll (surprise, elevation, etc.) you deal an additional +1d6 Damage.

Harrow
Announce a raid against a target no more than a week's travel away to a motley audience of thieves, ruffians and thugs, and roll vs your CHA. If you pass, 2d6 + your CHA modifer of them will join you on your raid. If you fail only 1d6 + your CHA modifier will join. All participants will expect a share of the plunder and will not hesitate to stick you in the ribs if you try and short them, otherwise they'll be reliable in a fight and excellent drinking company. This ability can't be used to lure hirelings to a dungeon - they're in it as much to steal from and cause havoc for a living target as they are for the loot, dungeons just don't have the same appeal as riding through a settlement flinging burning brands.

Credit, Da Yu


Backgrounds

Roll and gain the following background, then roll on the results underneath. Asterisks indicate that you are literate:

1. Criminal; 2. Foreigner; 3. Frontier; 4. Soldier; 5. Unusual

1. Criminal
1.* You know how to get into hard-to-reach places quickly and quietly. Start with 50' of rope, a grappling hook and a detailed map of a nearby fortified location.
2. You held up travellers and carriages on country roads, demanding their money or their lives. Start with the 'Banditry' skill, a sturdy riding horse (with saddlebags) and 2d12sp in ill-gotten gains.
3. Turf wars were serious business, and sometimes risking the death penalty for arson was worth the chance to put an enemy out of business entirely. Start with the 'Law' skill and 3 flasks of oil.
4. You rustled cattle and horses, risking the hangman's noose with each outing. Start with the 'Husbandry' skill, 50' of rope and a riding horse. You can tell the value and breeding of a horse by sight.
5. Sometimes the best ways into an rival's turf lie underground, even if they smell terrible. Start with a vial of antitoxin, some heavily soiled clothes and take 1 Boon to Saves vs Disease.
6. You lead a band of vicious cutthroats in raids on villages and farms, sowing chaos in your wake. The War put a stop to your activities after your band was dispersed by force. Start with the 'Banditry' skill, a tent and a riding horse (with saddlebags).

2. Foreigner
1. You raided and plundered from overseas, arriving by ship at dusk and leaving before sunrise. Replace your starting equipment with Medium Armour and a medium weapon of your choice. Start with the 'Sailing' skill. You can see up to 30' away in unlit conditions.
2. Your people lived on horseback, roaming the steppe and raiding their neighbours with impunity. Replace your pistol & Apostles with a bow and a quiver of 20 arrows. Start with the 'Husbandry' skill, a hardy steppe horse (with saddlebags) and take 1 Boon when foraging for supplies. You can shoot a bow from horseback without penalty.
3. You hail from a desert land where the only permanent settlements exist in lush fortified valleys and mountain passes. Start with the 'Vagabond' skill and a peculiar mount (with saddlebags or equivalent). Replace your starting equipment with loose clothing instead of light armour, and a medium weapon of your choice instead of a pistol & Apostles. You can always find water if any is present within 5 miles when travelling overland and you make all Saves to resist the effects of heat with 2 Boons if you are not wearing armour.
4. Life in your homeland was rudely interrupted by strange people wielding mysterious weapons that roared with the power of the gods and riding beasts that towered over the height of a man. Their settlements began to take root, but proved to be easy picking for you and your fellows. Maybe the home of these people holds more riches? Start with clothing that instantly marks you out as a foreigner and a matchlock arquebus (with 10m of matchcord). If you can see the sky you have a 4-in-6 chance to determine cardinal north.
5. Your people were always engaged in low-level, endemic warfare to procure captives for divine sacrifices. Start with the 'Religion' skill, a polished skull and an Interesting Scar.
6.* You hunted outlaws, criminals and other fugitives from justice in your homeland. Maybe you were one once. You bear a visible tattoo, scar or brand as a mark of your profession. You start with the 'Law' skill, a set of manacles and a target who you have been hunting for a long time.

3. Frontier
1. Stealing, robbing and killing was a way of life out in the Marches. You were very good at it. Start with the 'Banditry' skill and 1gp.
2. The mountains breed hardy folk, and your clan was no exception. The little grazing land that existed was fiercely fought over and you can fight better than anyone on a rock face or scree slope. Start with the 'Mountaineer' skill, 10 iron spikes (1 inventory slot) an ice axe (light weapon) and winter clothing. You ignore the Movement penalty for mountainous terrain.
3. Not all Reivers got their start as criminals and thugs - you were hired as a guide through the heath and moor. You start with the 'Geography' skill, 3 days-worth of extra rations and take 1 Boon when foraging for supplies.
4.* Raiding enemies on either side of the borderlands was a well-defined process in Marcher Law. You specialised in leading reprisal raids to avenge your family's honour. Start with the 'Law' skill, a lance with a singed lump of peat affixed to the point and an extremely loud holler.
5. A head of cattle could buy an awful lot out in the borderlands. So what if some occasionally went missing from the local farmers? They always seemed to have more. Start with a riding horse (with saddlebags), 50' of rope and 3 days-worth of beef jerky. Your Stealth score is not affected while riding a horse at night time.
6. The fens and wetlands were your home and the swamps provided most of what you needed, the inhabitants of the bordering regions supplied the rest. Start with the 'Fishing' skill, a net and a fishing line. Replace your pistol and Apostles with a trident (medium weapon).

4. Soldier
1. You specialised in scaling walls and infiltrating fortifications and settlements unnoticed to cause havoc from within. Start with the 'Siege' skill, a grappling hook and 50' of rope. You know how to throw a grappling hook to make virtually no noise.
2. You were pressed into service and rode with a troop of light cavalry, specialising in chevauchee scorched earth tactics. Start with an extra 1d6gp, a warhorse (with saddlebags) and a goat.
3. You may not have liked being a sailor, but your skill with a blade and affinity with fire served you well in ship-to-ship combat. Start with the 'Sailing' skill and replace your dagger with a medium weapon of your choice.
4. You didn't fight, but you followed the army and stripped the battlefields bare after the fighting was over. Start with the 'Scavenge' skill and 1d6 trinkets worth 1d20sp each. There is a 1-in-10 chance that someone recognises the trinket you're selling.
5. While your comrades sought their thrill in the chaos and bloodshed of the battlefield, you always preferred the sack and pillage. Especially when flames were involved. Start with 3 flasks of oil (1 inventory slot), 1d3gp and an Interesting Scar.
6. While looting and pillaging after the battle was all well and good, you much preferred fleecing your fellows of their hard earned lucre at dice. Start with the 'Gambling' skill, a set of dice and 1d8gp.

5. Unusual
Discuss your background with the GM depending on the option you roll below:

1. You were hired to track and help capture strange beasts for private collectors or bored lords who wanted some more unusual sport. You specialised in hunting: 1. Humanoids; 2. Reptiles; 3. Avians; 4. Insectoids. You have a 2-in-6 chance of knowing the weakness of a target if they match this type. Start with a weighted net and 50' of rope.
2. You do not ride horses. Why ride when your own legs can carry you far and wide? You don't need to wear shoes and can run at a steady pace for 8 hours, provided you are not encumbered, after which you must rest.
3.* Your order specialises in hunting rogue wizards and sorcerers and destroying their lairs. Start play with a holy symbol and a magic scroll of a random defensive spell. Your body is covered from neck to ankle in intricate, silvered arcane tattoos and you make all Saves vs magic with 1 Boon. If a significant portion of your body is scarred or the tattoos are otherwise damaged you lose this bonus until you can source the expensive ingredients needed to mix into the ink and a tattooist from your order.
4.* You were a feared raider and brigand, until you went to sack a remote monastery. No-one knows what the monks said to you but you turned on your comrades and slew them before donning a monk's habit yourself. Start with the 'Religion' skill, a holy symbol and 3 vials of holy water (1 inventory slot). You take +1 to Saves vs Fear.
5. You were abandoned as a child and raised by wild animals. You learned how to survive in the wild and help yourself to other peoples' belongings, but eventually your curiosity got the better of you and now you live among them, or attempt to. Start with the 'Scavenge' skill and replace your equipment with fur clothing and a medium weapon of your choice. You take 1 Bane on all social interactions with other civilised peoples, but take 2 Boons when determining the reaction of wild animals.
6. Your skills were as much use below ground as above it. You saw some horrors down in the caves. Start with the 'Spelunking' skill and 50' of rope. You always know if a tunnel is leading you upwards or downwards and take +1 to Saves vs Fear.

Comments

  1. This is probably my favorite of the GLOG classes online. But what are fatigue levels and boons?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you like it! To answer your questions:

      Boons (and their opposite, Banes) are taken from Shadow of the Demon Lord - instead of applying a concrete modifier the player rolls a d20 and a d6, the d6 result modifying the roll positively (as a Boon) or negatively (as a Bane).

      Fatigue is an extra feature that Skerples came up with in their Spiked Goblin Punch hack - it's gained by doing tiring or strenuous activity and each point of Fatigue occupies an inventory slot. I play it so that once a PC's inventory is filled up they pass out.

      Once I get Pike & Shotte fully put together these will make much more sense!

      Delete

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